Too much macho posturing in rock?

First off I must make the usual disclaimer that while this is the Louder Than Dirt blog, the primary contributor so far is DK. Since there is little drama among the members of the band, who are hardworking comrades, I find that the conflicts that affect me in my relations with the band are internal to me.
My daughter recently wrote a song for her excellent band The Romero Sisters with the refrain, “Rock and roll is a masculine artform.” The song asserts that women should occupy a more prominent place in the manner of music my daughter loves. She professes to enjoy LTD shows, and I’m not so egotistical as to think that that the song is about me. Nevertheless, Louder Than Dirt consists entirely of men, and manly men we are too. Julian is tall, tan, and athletic. Both Lawsky brothers sport ultra-masculine shaven pates. Continue reading

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The Courage of Horrible Sounds: A Gonzo Meditation

My favorite record by Radiohead is Kid A, not, I take it, their most famous record, but in my opinion a sleeper.  That album contains many sounds that, taken in isolation, sound horrible, but in their contexts are sublime.  Supposedly, at the time that album emerged, the members of Radiohead were much taken with Autechre and the whole genre of digitally created blips and blorps.  Now, the blip-blorp school of music is indeed boring and trivial, but Kid A is a deeply moving artifact.  Here, as is so often the case, influence and genesis are truly quite irrelevant.  All that matters is the individual achievement.  Keats, for example, was greatly influenced by Edmund Spenser, who is worth a look, and the Continue reading